Trinity College Science Society
is the most active science society in Cambridge, providing a rich programme of seminar series, panel discussions, film nights, and other social events. While based in Trinity College, all talks are free and open to all members of the university and the general public, and are accompanied by generous refreshments. Browse through our programme for the coming year to see the remarkable speakers and events we have lined up.


Latest news:

TCSS and the Trinity College Mathematical Society are jointly organising the Cambridge Puzzle Hunt, due to take place in January 2017. For more information, visit the Cambridge Puzzle Hunt website.
posted on 19 Oct 2016

Our next event:

Tue
28
Feb
Prof Harvey Reall speaking on
Gravitational waves from merging black holes
General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, predicts that the motion of large masses at high speeds produces gravitational waves: disturbances in the gravitational field that travel at the speed of light. In September 2015, the LIGO observatory made the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The waves were produced in the merger of a pair of black holes, each about 30 times as massive as our Sun, moving at a significant fraction of the speed of light. During the merger, the power output in gravitational waves exceeded the luminosity of all the stars in the visible Universe. This is the first observation of a phenomenon involving a strong, highly dynamical, gravitational field, a regime in which General Relativity had not been tested previously by observations. I will review these developments, focusing on the theoretical predictions and the extent to which these have been confirmed by observations.
18:15   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre

Events

Tue
28
Feb
Prof Harvey Reall speaking on
Gravitational waves from merging black holes
General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, predicts that the motion of large masses at high speeds produces gravitational waves: disturbances in the gravitational field that travel at the speed of light. In September 2015, the LIGO observatory made the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The waves were produced in the merger of a pair of black holes, each about 30 times as massive as our Sun, moving at a significant fraction of the speed of light. During the merger, the power output in gravitational waves exceeded the luminosity of all the stars in the visible Universe. This is the first observation of a phenomenon involving a strong, highly dynamical, gravitational field, a regime in which General Relativity had not been tested previously by observations. I will review these developments, focusing on the theoretical predictions and the extent to which these have been confirmed by observations.
18:15   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Tue
7
Mar
Dr Kelly BéruBé speaking on
Recycling Medical Waste Tissues: Bringing Life Back from the Dead
The respiratory system acts as a portal of entry into the human body for airborne materials which may gain access via the administration of medicines or inadvertently during inhalation of ambient air. The burden of lung disease has been continuously increasing to the point where it now represents a major cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the UK, more people die rom respiratory disease than from coronary heart disease or non-respiratory cancer. For this reason alone, gaining an understanding of mechanisms of human lung biology, especially in injury and repair events, is now a principal focus within the field of inhalation toxicology.

Animal models are routinely used to investigate lung disease but they do not truly reproduce the responses that occur in humans. Scientists committed to the more robust 3Rs principles of animal experimentation (i.e. Reduction, Refinement and Replacement) have been developing viable alternatives derived from human medical waste tissues, to generate in vitro models that resemble the in vivo human lung environment. In the specific case of inhalation toxicology, human-oriented models are especially warranted, given the new REACH regulations for the handling of chemicals, the rising air pollution problems and the availability of pharmaceutically valuable drugs.

Advances in tissue-engineering have made it feasible and cost-effective to construct human tissue equivalents of the respiratory epithelia. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue designs which make use of primary cells provide more in vivo-like responses based on targeted interactions of multiple cell types supported on artificial scaffolds. When 3-D cell cultures are employed for testing aerosolised materials (i.e. air pollution), responses are captured that mirror the events in the in situ human lung and provide human endpoint data, and thus, negating the need for animal models in medical research.

18:15   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
For more events, see our full programme or download our latest term card.
You can also subscribe to a calendar of our events here.