Trinity College Science Society
is the most active science society in Cambridge, providing a rich programme of seminar series, panel discussions, film nights, and other social events. While based in Trinity College, all talks are free and open to all members of the university and the general public, and are accompanied by generous refreshments. Browse through our programme for the coming year to see the remarkable speakers and events we have lined up.

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Science Society
Trinity College
Cambridge CB2 1TQ
United Kingdom

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President
††Bethany Craik
Secretary
††Harry Taylor
Treasurer
††George Qiao
Events Officer
††Rebecca Marton
Website maintenance
††Dan Safka
Publicity Officer
††Mary Fortune
General committee member
Will Grant
General committee member
Sara Devereux
General committee member
Andrew Carlotti
General committee member
Katya Morgunova
Senior Treasurer
††Dr Alan Weeds

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Find out more about
some organisations
we work with:

The Trinity Mathematical Society

The Royal Society

Association of British
Science Writers


Cambridge BioSoc

Cambridge
Triple Helix


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Sunoo [ email ]


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Our next event:

Tue
25
Nov
Prof. David Vaughan (British Antarctic Survey) speaking on
Ice and High Water - the Contribution of Polar Ice to Present and Future Sea-Level Rise
The future security and prosperity of Europeís coastal cities and survival of many unique coastal habitats requires scientists to deliver reliable sea-level projections which will form the basis of adaptation, management and protection planning for vulnerable coastal regions. Most of the contributions to sea-level rise can now be predicted with some confidence; the greatest remaining uncertainty lies in the contribution ice-loss from the polar ice sheets resting on Antarctica and Greenland. Indeed, the IPCC ís 2007 assessment contained a limited confidence in statements concerning the future contribution of ice sheet to sea-level rise. In this talk, I will highlight the recent progress that has allowed us to measure current ice-loss from Arctic glaciers and Greenland, and the key vulnerabilities that may lead to substantial loss in future, to irreversible ice- and eventually lead sheet retreat. I explain the relationship between global sea-level rise, and what we actually see along particular sectors of the coasts, and how sea-level rise will impact the frequency of damaging flood events on timescales ranging from years to centuries. I will talk about current work being undertaken at British Antarctic Survey to address these and other significant science questions, and the opportunities for UK scientists to develop science in Antarctica.
18:15   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre

Events

Tue
25
Nov
Prof. David Vaughan (British Antarctic Survey) speaking on
Ice and High Water - the Contribution of Polar Ice to Present and Future Sea-Level Rise
The future security and prosperity of Europeís coastal cities and survival of many unique coastal habitats requires scientists to deliver reliable sea-level projections which will form the basis of adaptation, management and protection planning for vulnerable coastal regions. Most of the contributions to sea-level rise can now be predicted with some confidence; the greatest remaining uncertainty lies in the contribution ice-loss from the polar ice sheets resting on Antarctica and Greenland. Indeed, the IPCC ís 2007 assessment contained a limited confidence in statements concerning the future contribution of ice sheet to sea-level rise. In this talk, I will highlight the recent progress that has allowed us to measure current ice-loss from Arctic glaciers and Greenland, and the key vulnerabilities that may lead to substantial loss in future, to irreversible ice- and eventually lead sheet retreat. I explain the relationship between global sea-level rise, and what we actually see along particular sectors of the coasts, and how sea-level rise will impact the frequency of damaging flood events on timescales ranging from years to centuries. I will talk about current work being undertaken at British Antarctic Survey to address these and other significant science questions, and the opportunities for UK scientists to develop science in Antarctica.
18:15   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
For more events, see our full programme or download our term card.