Trinity College Science Society
is the most active science society in Cambridge, providing a rich programme of seminar series, panel discussions, film nights, and other social events. While based in Trinity College, all talks are free and open to all members of the university and the general public, and are accompanied by generous refreshments. Browse through our programme for the coming year to see the remarkable speakers and events we have lined up.

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Science Society
Trinity College
Cambridge CB2 1TQ
United Kingdom

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» committee

President
Mary Fortune
Vice President
Bethany Craik
Secretary
Harry Taylor
Treasurer
George Qiao
Events Officer
Rebecca Marton
Website maintenance
Dan Safka
Publicity Officer
George Fortune
General committee member
Will Grant
General committee member
Sara Devereux
General committee member
Andrew Carlotti
General committee member
Katya Morgunova
Senior Treasurer
Dr Alan Weeds

» constitution

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» friends

Find out more about
some organisations
we work with:

The Trinity Mathematical Society

The Royal Society

Association of British
Science Writers


Cambridge BioSoc

Cambridge
Triple Helix


» website by

Sunoo


Our next event:

Sun
8
Mar
Symposium
The Trinity College Science Society Symposium and Dinner is a unique event spanning an entire day of talks by Trinity students. At the end of Lent term every year, current students of Trinity College present their research and findings to their peers in a friendly, informal environment. The event is free and open to all; no particular specialist knowledge is assumed. There is no need to stay for the whole day just drop in on talks you find interesting.
The timetable is:

10:00-10:45 Dr Arthur Norman: A Computing Project that has been running for 50 years
10:45-11:15 Guy Emerson: Teaching Computers to Read
11:15-11:45 Carl Turner: An Introduction to Instantons
11:45-12:15 Alexey Morgunov: The Not-So-Universal Genetic Code
12:15-13:15 Lunch
13:15-14:00 Prof. Didier Queloz: Exoplanets and the Nature of Other Worlds
14:00-14:30 Mary Fortune: Finding Shared Casual Variants Between Diseases
14:30-15:00 Madeline Kavanagh: Fragment Based Discovery of Potent and Selective CYP121 Inhibitors for Tuberculosis
15:00-15:30 Dan Safka: Raspberry Pi Imaging
15:30-16:00 Break
16:00-16:30 Emily Adlam: The Quantum Measurement Problem
16:30-17:00 Amelia Joy Thompson: Poking Brains: the Mechanics of Neural Development
17:00-17:45 Prof. Brakefield: Evolution on the Wing

10:00   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre

Events

Sun
8
Mar
Symposium
The Trinity College Science Society Symposium and Dinner is a unique event spanning an entire day of talks by Trinity students. At the end of Lent term every year, current students of Trinity College present their research and findings to their peers in a friendly, informal environment. The event is free and open to all; no particular specialist knowledge is assumed. There is no need to stay for the whole day just drop in on talks you find interesting.
The timetable is:

10:00-10:45 Dr Arthur Norman: A Computing Project that has been running for 50 years
10:45-11:15 Guy Emerson: Teaching Computers to Read
11:15-11:45 Carl Turner: An Introduction to Instantons
11:45-12:15 Alexey Morgunov: The Not-So-Universal Genetic Code
12:15-13:15 Lunch
13:15-14:00 Prof. Didier Queloz: Exoplanets and the Nature of Other Worlds
14:00-14:30 Mary Fortune: Finding Shared Casual Variants Between Diseases
14:30-15:00 Madeline Kavanagh: Fragment Based Discovery of Potent and Selective CYP121 Inhibitors for Tuberculosis
15:00-15:30 Dan Safka: Raspberry Pi Imaging
15:30-16:00 Break
16:00-16:30 Emily Adlam: The Quantum Measurement Problem
16:30-17:00 Amelia Joy Thompson: Poking Brains: the Mechanics of Neural Development
17:00-17:45 Prof. Brakefield: Evolution on the Wing

10:00   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Sun
8
Mar
Guy Emerson speaking on
Teaching Computers to Read

10:45   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Sun
8
Mar
Carl Turner speaking on
Tunnelling and Imaginary Time: Instantons
Quantum mechanics underlies our understanding of the physical world, but although it possesses a classical limit, it shouldnt be thought of as just giving small deviations from the familiar rules of Newtonian mechanics. In particular, quantum tunnelling gives a remarkable example of a classical impossibility rendered possible in the real world. In this talk, well look at a striking way to think about these effects which generalizes to applications to condensed matter, particle physics and even cosmology.
11:15   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Sun
8
Mar
Alexey Morgunov speaking on
The Not-So-Universal Genetic Code
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of Nirenberg and Leders work on deciphering the genetic code, the manual using which the information stored in the genes is converted into functional protein units. Half a century later, how well do we actually understand this most fundamental feature of all living systems? Despite some claims to the contrary, the genetic code is neither universal nor the most optimal.And how many amino acids are there, actually? (Hint: not 20.) How did the genetic code evolve, and why did it evolve the way it did? Is it still evolving? Can it be engineered? In my talk I will try addressing these questions and discuss what we know, what we think we know, and what we wish we knew about the evolution of the genetic code.
11:45   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Sun
8
Mar
Prof. Didier Queloz speaking on
Exoplanets and the nature of other worlds
Detection and characterization of planetary systems in the Universe is an historic scientific and human enterprise of this century. The completely unexpected characteristics of the many exoplanets found so far are capturing the interest of the scientific community as well as the general public imagination. After two decades of exoplanet discoveries the origin and nature of exoplanet remains surrounded by a glaze of mystery. Our Solar System seems one of the many solution Nature experiments when making planets. This talk will provide an outlook of main results in exoplanet research programs and prospects in further characterization of planet structures and atmospheres
13:15   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
For more events, see our full programme or download our term card.