Trinity College Science Society
is the most active science society in Cambridge, providing a rich programme of seminar series, panel discussions, film nights, and other social events. While based in Trinity College, all talks are free and open to all members of the university and the general public, and are accompanied by generous refreshments. Browse through our programme for the coming year to see the remarkable speakers and events we have lined up.

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Science Society
Trinity College
Cambridge CB2 1TQ
United Kingdom

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President
Rebeka Marton
Vice-President
Francois Sherwood
Secretary
Sara Devereux
Events Officer
George Fortune
Publicity Officer
Andrew Carlotti
Website Maintenance
Adam Prada
Treasurer
Jas Gahir
General committee member
Will Gao
General committee member
Sarah Garland
General committee member
Tom Hodson
General committee member
Song Wei Mah
General committee member
Katya Morgunova
General committee member
Attila Szabo
Senior Treasurer
Alan Weeds


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Find out more about
some organisations
we work with:

The Trinity Mathematical Society

The Royal Society

Association of British
Science Writers


Cambridge BioSoc

Cambridge
Triple Helix


» website by

Sunoo


Our next event:

Tue
9
Feb
Prof John Duncan speaking on
A core brain system in human intelligence
Tests of simple problem-solving are widely used as measures of human intelligence, and indeed, performance in these tests is widely predictive of success in all manner of laboratory and everyday activities. Beginning from this observation, now around a century old, I address the modern cognitive neuroscience of intelligent behaviour. In human brain imaging studies, a common or multiple-demand (MD) pattern of frontal and parietal activity is associated with diverse cognitive demands, and with standard problem-solving tests. In complex behaviour, goals are achieved by assembling a series of sub-tasks, creating structured mental programs, and based on behavioural studies of problem-solving, I suggest that MD cortex plays a key role in defining and controlling the parts of such programs. In agreement, physiological studies in human and monkey brain show the activity of MD cortex in dynamic construction of cognitive or attentional episodes. By these means, I suggest, the MD system provides a critical neurophysiological basis for intelligent thought and action.
18:15   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre

Events

Tue
9
Feb
Prof John Duncan speaking on
A core brain system in human intelligence
Tests of simple problem-solving are widely used as measures of human intelligence, and indeed, performance in these tests is widely predictive of success in all manner of laboratory and everyday activities. Beginning from this observation, now around a century old, I address the modern cognitive neuroscience of intelligent behaviour. In human brain imaging studies, a common or multiple-demand (MD) pattern of frontal and parietal activity is associated with diverse cognitive demands, and with standard problem-solving tests. In complex behaviour, goals are achieved by assembling a series of sub-tasks, creating structured mental programs, and based on behavioural studies of problem-solving, I suggest that MD cortex plays a key role in defining and controlling the parts of such programs. In agreement, physiological studies in human and monkey brain show the activity of MD cortex in dynamic construction of cognitive or attentional episodes. By these means, I suggest, the MD system provides a critical neurophysiological basis for intelligent thought and action.
18:15   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Tue
16
Feb
Film Night: Interstellar
Earth's future has been riddled by disasters, famines, and droughts. There is only one way to ensure mankind's survival: Interstellar travel. A newly discovered wormhole in the far reaches of our solar system allows a team of astronauts to go where no man has gone before, a planet that may have the right environment to sustain human life.
19:00   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Fri
26
Feb
Prof Béla Bollobás speaking on
W.T. Tutte – Codebreaker and Mathematician
Bill Tutte, who came up to Trinity to read Natural Sciences, specialising in chemistry, was the greatest codebreaker of WWII, and one of the founders of modern combinatorics. In this talk I shall say a little about his work as a codebreaker, and a little more about some of his revolutionary ideas in mathematics.

This talk is jointly hosted by TMS and TCSS.

19:30   ·   Centre for Mathematical Sciences
Tue
1
Mar
Prof Michael Cates speaking on
Mathematical models of cellular locomotion
Many types of cell in our bodies are not static but actively move around. The effects can be good, such as when immune cells search and destroy invading organisms, or bad, such as when cancer cells spread to distant parts of the body. Many biochemical circuits are implicated in cell movement, but cell fragments with no such circuits also move spontaneously -- the cellular equivalent of a headless chicken. This observation suggests the presence of an autonomous "motility engine" whose operation is controlled, but not maintained, by the complex biochemical circuits present in real cells. I shall describe a simplified mathematical model for this engine, using ideas borrowed from the study of liquid crystalline materials, as found in every mobile phone and laptop screen.

This talk is jointly hosted by TMS and TCSS.

19:00   ·   Centre for Mathematical Sciences
Sun
6
Mar
Symposium
The Trinity College Science Society Symposium and Dinner is a unique event spanning an entire day of talks by Trinity students. At the end of Lent term every year, current students of Trinity College present their research and findings to their peers in a friendly, informal environment. There will also be some talks given by Fellows at the college. The event is free and open to all; no particular specialist knowledge is assumed. There is no need to stay for the whole day – just drop in on talks you find interesting.

Keynote Speakers:
Professor Colin Hughes -- Professor of Microbiology at the Department of Pathology
Professor Stephen Elliott -- Professor of Chemistry, Chemical Physics group leader
Dr Nir Navon -- Research fellow at the Cavendish laboratory

More details to follow.

10:00   ·   Winstanley Lecture Theatre
For more events, see our full programme or download our latest term card.